Trichomoniasis

 

What is trichomoniasis?

Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted infection.

 

Symptoms?

Symptoms may develop after sexual contact contact with someone else with the infection.

 

Females

  • Sometimes you may notice a discharge or fluid leaking from the vagina.

  • There is sometimes a bad smell or odour in the genital area.

  • You may feel itchy or sore in the genitals.

  • Many woman have no symptoms.

 

Males

  • Most men do not have symptoms, however they can still pass trichomoniasis on.

  • Some men may have discharge or fluid leaking from the penis and/or pain when passing urine.

 

How does someone get trichomoniasis?

Trichomoniasis is passed on by having sex, sexual contact or sex play with another person with trichomoniasis. It can also be passed by sharing sex toys, e.g. vibrators.

 

How do I get checked for trichomoniasis?

Go see your doctor/nurse or sexual health clinic for a check up.  You can ring us on 06 871 5307 to book an appointment to see a nurse.  

 

  • Women will need a swab test from the vagina.

  • Trichomoniasis is difficult to test for in men, so men are usually just treated if they have had sex with someone with trichomoniasis.

  • It may be embarassing, but it is better to get checked than to have untreated trichomoniasis.

 

How do I get treated?

A single dose of the right tablets usually cures it. The tablets sometimes make you feel a bit sick, but it helps if you take them with food. Don't drink alcohol for 24 hours after taking the tablets as it will make you feel really sick. 

 

Important advice:

  • You should use a condom for 7 days after treatment, so you don't pass the infection on to someone else.

  • You need to tell everyone you have had sex with in the last 2 months to get treated for trichomoniasis and have a sexual health check.

  • Don't have unprotected sex with your partner(s) until 7 days after they have been treated, or you may get trichomoniasis again. 

Candidiasis

 

What is candidiasis?

Thrush or candidiasis is an infection caused by an overgrowth of yeast called Candida Albicans. This yeast can be found normally in many areas of the body and is not considered to be a sexually transmitted infection. This is a very common infection. 

 

Symptoms?

  • Symptoms can include vaginal itching, irritation, burning, and sometimes a thich white discharge.

  • Men might have symptoms of redness, itch and discharge under the foreskin of the penis.

  • Symptoms for both men and women are usually more noticeable after intercourse.

 

How does someone get candidiasis?

There are some things that can trigger an infection with thrush such as antibiotic treatment, pregnancy, diabetes, wearing synthetic underwear or wet swimwear.

 

How do I get checked for candidiasis?

Go see your doctor/nurse or sexual health clinic for a check up. You can ring us on 06 871 5307 to book an appointment to see a nurse.

 

Thrush or Candidiasis can be easily diagnosed by doing a simple vaginal swab test.

 

How do I get treated?

  • Treatment can be given in 2 forms, either a pill or an antifungal cream.

  • Treatment is offered if a woman or man has symptoms on the day of examination.

  • It is important not to have Unprotected Sexual Intercourse while you have symptoms as it can be passed to your partner.

 

Important advice:

Return of symptoms is common and some people appear to be more susceptible to recurrent infection. Sometimes a longer course of treatment may reduce the return of the symptoms. It is important to identify what is triggering your recurrence.

 

To prevent thrush:

  • Wear loose cotton clothing, especially cotton underwear.

  • Avoid stockings or tights.

  • Wash and dry your genital region daily.

  • Wash with water only.

  • Avoid deodorised soaps, bubble baths, or talc powders in your genital region.

  • Avoid spermicidal condoms, and use only water based lubricants.

  • Always use condoms.

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) Info:

 

This information was is sourced from the Sexually Transmitted Infections Guidelines 2015, if you would like more information go to justthefacts.co.nz or contact us on 06 871 5307 and ask to speak to our nurse.  

Chlamydia

 

What is chlamydia?

Chlmydia is a common STI that is easy to treat it is also easy to catch and can cause serious problems if you don't get it treated.  It is very common in people aged less than 25.  

 

Symptoms?

Sometimes there can be no symptoms, however if they were to experience any symptoms they could be:

 

Females:

  • Pain when urinating or low tummy pain especially during sex

  • Unusual bleeding between periods or after sex

  • Sometimes if there is anal sex, chlamydia can cuse discharge or bleeding from the anus. 

 

Males:

  • Soreness, an unusal dischare or itching in the opening at the end of the penis (urethra).  There can also be pain when urinating

  • Discharge or bleeding from the anus if there was anal sex

  • Very occasionally there can be pain or swelling in the testicles.  

 

How does someone get chlamydia?

By having sex or sexual contact with another person who is infected.  

 

Types of sexual contact include vaginal and anal sex, and sometimes oral sex, sharing sex toys, or sex play.  If you use condoms every time you have sex you are much less likely to get chlamydia.  Chlamydia can also be passed from mother to baby during birth and may result in an eye or lung infection in the baby.  

 

How do I get checked for chlamydia?

Go see your doctor/nurse or sexual health clinic for a check up.  You can ring us on 06 871 5307 to book an appointment to see a nurse.  

 

Females:

  • You will need a swab from the vagina.  

 

Males:

  • You will need to do a urine test 

 

How do I get treated?

You will need to task some tablets - usually a single dose of an antibiotic cures chlamydia.  

 

Important advice:

  • Finish all the tablets you have been given, even if you feel better

  • You need to tell anyone you have had sex withwithin the last 2 months to get tesed and treated for chlamydia.

  • You should use condoms or avoid sex for 7 days after yo uhave been treated, so you don't pas the infection on to someone else. 

  • Have another sexual health cehck in 3 months in case you get chlamydia again.  

Syphilis

 

What is syphilis?

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection. It is quite easy to catch and can cause serious problems if you don't get it treated. It has been increasing in New Zealand particularly in men having sex with men (MSM). Having untreated syphilis increases your chances of catching HIV infection.

 

Symptoms?

 

  • About 50% of people don't have any symptoms and would not know without having a blood test.

  • People without symptoms can still get problems later on if they are not treated.

  • At the infectious stage people without symptoms can still pass the infection to their sexual partners.

 

How do I get checked for syphilis?

Go see your doctor/nurse or sexual health clinic for a check up. You can ring us on 06 871 5307 to book an appointment to see a nurse.

 

  • Syphilis is usually diagnosed by a blood test.

  • The test can take up to 3 months after you get the infection to become positive.

  • It may be negative if you test too soon, but treatment is usually recommended if you have had sexual contact with someone with syphilis, even if the test is negative.

  • If you have symptoms, you may also need to have samples taken from the sores or body rash.

  • Syphilis is one fo the routine blood tests in pregnant women.

 

How do I get treated?

  • You will need injections of an antibiotic called penicillin.

  • If you are allergic to penicillin other antibiotics will be used.

  • Proper treatment of the mother during pregnancy will prevent the baby being born with syphilis.

  • The blood tests can stay positive for months or years after the disease has been successfully treated, but this is nothing to worry about.

 

Important advice:

  • You must finish all the treatment to be cured.

  • If you have syphilis you will need to tell sexual partners to get tested and treated.

  • The doctor or nurse will tell you how far back to notify partners - usually anyone in the last 3 to 6 months.

  • Do not have sex until any sores or rashes have completely gone away.

  • After treatment, follow up blood tests are essential for at least one year to make sure cure is complete.

Gonorrhoea

 

What is gonorrhoea?

Gonorrhoea is an STI that is very common in people aged less than 25.  Gonorrhoea is very easy to catch and also very easy to treat.  It may cause serious problems if you don't get it treated.  

 

Symptoms?

 

Females:

  • Women often have no symptoms.

  • There may be a discharge or fluid leaking from the vagina

  • There may be pain when passing urine, bleeding between periods or tummy pain

  • There can be discharge or bleeding from the anus if a person has had anal sex.

 

Males:

  • Men are more likely to have symptoms. 

  • There can be dischare or fluid leaking from the penis.

  • Pain when passing urine

  • sometimes there may be pain or swelling in the testicles. 

  • Sometimes there can be discharge or bleeding from the anus if a person has had anal sex.  

 

How does someone get gonorrhoea?

  • You can get  gonorrhoea by having sex or sexual contact with another person with gonorrhoea.  

  • This includes ora, vaginal or anal sex and sex play.  

  • If you use a condom every time you have sex you are much less likely to get gonorrhoea

  • Gonorrhoea can also be passed from mother to baby during birth.  

 

How do I get checked for gonorrhoea?

Go see your doctor/nurse or sexual health clinic for a check up.  You can ring us on 06 871 5307 to book an appointment to see a nurse.  

 

Females:

  • You will need a swab from the vagina.  

 

Males:

  • You will need to do a swab test from the urethra (opening of the penis) .   

 

How do I get treated?

You will need an injection and to take some tablets. A single dose of the right treatment usually cures gonorrhea. You may need to take tablets for up to 2 weeks if the infection is more serious.

 

Important advice:

  • Finish all the tablets you have been given, even if you feel better

  • You need to tell anyone you have had sex withwithin the last 2 months to get tesed and treated for chlamydia.

  • You should use condoms or avoid sex for 7 days after yo uhave been treated, so you don't pas the infection on to someone else. 

  • Have another sexual health cehck in 3 months in case you get chlamydia again.  

DIRECTIONS YOUTH HEALTH CENTRE 

TE WHARE HAUORA MO TE RANGATAHI 

© 2016 by Directions Youth Health Centre. All rights reserved.

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Monday:        09:00am - 05:00pm

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